jeffsoesbe (jeffsoesbe) wrote,
jeffsoesbe
jeffsoesbe

Visiting the Nina

A replica of the Nina, built by the Columbus Foundation, was docked in Sacramento Old Town for a couple weeks, so last weekend we went to go check it out.





A view of the Nina from the front, walking towards the boat:



Here's the front sail:



A view from the bow towards the stern:



Another view from the bow, aiming down. Behind the "bag" is a wood lattice, the opening to the quarters below:



Just in front of the bag in the previous picture is the windlass. I didn't get a picture of it, but I got a nice picture of the sign:



Looking up at the mainsail:



Standing behind the mainsail, looking towards the bow:



The aft sails:



Below the sails, the top of the aft deck (aka the poop deck):



Below the poop deck, the poop cabin:



On the right front side of the poop cabin, is the opening to the captain's quarters. At least, as much of a quarters as it is:





I personally was very impressed, both at the construction and at the small size of a ship that was used to sail from Europe to the Americas (Caribbean). They actually take volunteers for month shifts, and I have to admit the thought seriously crossed my mind (I have a fondness for sailing). The current volunteers noticed as well - when I was admiring the masts and checking out the ropes, one of them said "Looks like a new volunteer!". Maybe they say that to all the young sailing boys.

Beyond a yearning to head out to sea, I also got some good story ideas and a sense of the environment of a ship like that. The real crew was 24-27 sailors, who slept on deck (the cabins below were all for animals and food stores). What an amazing life that would be.
Tags: history, nina
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